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DENTAL SOLUTIONS

OUR GENERAL PROCEDURES

At Polyviou Family Dentistry, we believe in the best standard of care possible for our patients. Each cleaning visit includes a free blood pressure screening, as well as a thorough oral cancer screening. We use the latest technology to comfortably remove tartar, stain and plaque. Necessary digital x-rays will be taken, so a proper diagnosis can be made regarding cavities and gum disease. Digital x-rays are also used to detect problem areas in the jawbone that can’t be detected on just a visual exam. An intraoral camera is also used to aid in detecting cavities or cracks in the teeth.

 

A “root canal” is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that has become badly decayed or infected. The procedure entails removing the nerve and pulp of the tooth; after which, the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed.

The pulp, sometimes referred to as the “pulp chamber,” is the soft area within the center of the tooth.

The tooth’s nerve lies within root canals, which lie within the roots (also known as “legs”) of the tooth. The root canals travel from the tip of the tooth’s root into the pulp chamber, which also contains blood vessels and connective tissue that nourish the tooth.

A tooth’s nerve is not vitally important to a tooth’s health and function after the tooth has emerged through the gums. Its only function is sensory — to provide the sensation of hot or cold. The presence or absence of a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of the tooth.

Why does the pulp need to be removed?
When nerve tissue or pulp is damaged, it breaks down into bacteria that begin to multiply within the pulp chamber. The bacteria and other decayed debris can cause an infection or abscess, a pus-filled pocket, which can form at the end of the root. An abscess occurs when infection spreads all the way past the end of the root. In addition to abscess, an infection in the root canal of a tooth can also spur:

-Swelling that may spread to other areas of the face, neck, or head.

-Bone loss around the tip of the root.

-Drainage problems extending outward from the root. (A hole can occur through the side of the tooth with infection spreading into the gums and cheeks.)

How painful is the procedure?
Root canal procedures have the reputation of being painful. Actually, most people report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a filling placed. For more information, schedule a consultation with Polyviou Family Dentistry today.

A bridge (also called a “fixed partial denture”) is a restoration that replaces or spans the space where one or more teeth have been lost. There are two types of bridges – fixed and removable. A fixed bridge is bonded or cemented into place – only a dentist can remove it. As its name describes, a removable bridge (more commonly known as a “removable partial denture”) can readily be taken out of the mouth for cleaning. Although removable bridges are generally less expensive, fixed bridges may feel more stable and comfortable.

Why do I need a bridge?
Your appearance, overall dental health and proper functioning of your mouth are all important reasons for wearing a bridge. When teeth are lost, it can put unnatural stress on your other teeth and cause them to shift, making proper brushing and regular hygiene hard to accomplish, leaving the door open to a myriad of other problems.

A bridge, of course, has great cosmetic appeal as it offers cover for a lost tooth. In some cases, the loss of a back tooth may cause your mouth to sink and your face to look older. Bridges can help maintain the natural shape of your face and may help support your lips and cheeks.

How is a bridge attached?
A fixed bridge is commonly cemented to the natural teeth next to the space left by the missing teeth. A false tooth (called a “pontic”) replaces the lost tooth. A pontic is attached to a crown (a restoration that covers a tooth). Crowns, which are cemented on natural teeth, serve as abutments that provide support for the bridge.

Are there different types of bridges?
Yes. For example, implants attach artificial teeth directly into the jaw or under the gum tissue. Because they require surgery, candidates for implants should have good general health and have adequate bone to support an implant.

In some instances, a resin-bonded bridge, frequently called a “Maryland Bridge,” can be used to replace one or more missing teeth. Because the bridge is attached by a special procedure called “bonding,” it doesn’t require the use of crowns or extensive tooth preparation. Polyviou Family Dentistry can help you determine which treatment method is appropriate for you.

Remember, the ultimate success or failure of a fixed bridge depends on its foundation. Help keep your gums and remaining teeth healthy! Your oral health and appearance are worth the effort!

To prevent future problems and promote optimum oral health, follow these simple tips:


  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Brush after each meal (especially before going to bed).
  • Clean between your teeth daily with dental floss.
  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacks. Avoid carbohydrates such as candy, pretzels and chips, which can remain on the tooth surface.
  • If you consume sticky foods, brush your teeth shortly afterwards.
  • Ask the dentist about the use of supplemental fluoride, which can strengthen your teeth.
  • Dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) can be applied, so the chewing surfaces of your back teeth (otherwise known as your molars) can be protected from decay.

Malocclusion and Periodontal Diseases
Malocclusion affects 74% of American adults. If you have malocclusion, it may affect your periodontal health, because it is difficult to remove plaque when teeth are not aligned. Periodontal disease can begin as gum redness or bleeding while brushing your teeth or using dental floss, and you may notice halitosis, or bad breath. If not treated, gum inflammation can become worse, leading to soft tissue damage, receding gums, the formation of pockets between teeth and gums, bone loss, and eventually tooth loss.

The Progression of Periodontal Disease
When teeth are crowded, plaque with harmful bacteria can attach to the tooth surface down to the bottom of the pocket. Plaque can be tedious to remove from crowded areas because it is difficult to brush and floss there. Bacteria can cause gum tissue surrounding the tooth to degrade, and if not treated, result in bone loss.

Wear and Trauma
Poorly aligned teeth can also create unnatural stress and pressure on teeth and jaws. Teeth that are subject to excessive pressure can develop chipping and notches at the gum line called abfractions. Premature wear can lead to poor root support, loose teeth and eventually, tooth loss.

Why are Crooked Teeth a Problem?
Teeth that are not aligned properly in your mouth create what dentists call malocclusion. Left untreated, malocclusion can lead to periodontal disease and create abnormal amounts of stress on teeth and jaws, which leads to premature wear.

What Type Of Malocclusion Do You Have?
Here are some potential issues.

CROWDING
Buildup of plaque and tartar
Harbors harmful periodontal bacteria
Risk of periodontal disease, tooth, and bone loss

SPACING
Food lodges between teeth
Risk of sore, tender gums
Risk of periodontal disease

DEEP BITE
Over-erupted lower front teeth that can damage the palate
Premature wear and chipping of the lower front teeth

CROSSBITE
Premature tooth wear and risk of chipped teeth
Abfraction — small notch in tooth at the gumline
Periodontal disease, tooth and bone loss

EXCESSIVE OVERJET
Chipped or fractured front teeth
Trauma to front teeth

EDGE -TO-EDGE BITE
Risk of teeth chipping and breaking
Jaw joint pain
Shortened or worn down front teeth

OPEN BITE
Abfraction — small notch in tooth at gumline
Gum recession, loose teeth and bone loss
Excessive, premature wear on back teeth
If left untreated, malocclusion can lead to periodontal disease and premature wear of teeth that can worsen over time and even result in tooth loss. Periodontal disease may also increase the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (hardening of the arteries).



(Crossbite)


(Crowding)


(Openbite)


(Deepbite)

 

Straight Teeth are Healthier Teeth
Straight, properly aligned teeth can help you avoid the negative effects of periodontal disease.

HEALTHIER GUMS
Properly aligned teeth are easier to brush and floss than crowded or crooked teeth.  Properly positioned teeth can help gums “fit” more tightly around them, which may lead to better periodontal health.

IMPROVED HYGIENE
With good oral hygiene, the chances of having plaque retention, tooth decay, and periodontal disease can be reduced.

DECREASED RISK OF ABNORMAL WEAR AND TRAUMA
Properly aligned teeth also reduce the risk of expensive procedures required to repair the effects of abnormal force, such as tooth chipping, breaking or wear, and can be less stressful on the supporting jaw bone and joints.

MALOCCLUSION: A RISK TO OVERALL HEALTH
Severe periodontal infection, if untreated, may increase the risk for atherosclerosis-induced conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke, complications of diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and respiratory diseases.

 

Systemic Problems

  1. Bacteria forms a film underneath the gums, particularly where teeth are misaligned.  Gum pockets form, further trapping bacteria and debris.
  2. Bacteria inflames the gum tissues and kills gum tissue cells and can invade connective tissue and blood vessels.
  3. Your immune system creates white blood cells and proteins to fight the inflammation.
  4. The combination of bacteria, toxins, white blood cells, and acute phase proteins damages the cells that line your coronary arteries, resulting in plaque and leading to hardening of  the arteries.

At Polyviou Family Dentistry, we believe in the best standard of hygienic care possible for our patients. Each cleaning visit includes a free blood pressure screening, as well as a thorough oral cancer screening. We use the latest technology to comfortably remove tartar, stain and plaque. Necessary radiographs will be taken, so a proper diagnosis can be made regarding cavities and gum disease. Radiographs are also used to detect infections, cysts or possible cancer in the jawbone that can’t be detected on just a visual exam. An intraoral camera is also used to aid in detecting cavities or cracks in the teeth.

A “root canal” is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that has become badly decayed or infected. The procedure entails removing the nerve and pulp of the tooth; after which, the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed.

The pulp, sometimes referred to as the “pulp chamber,” is the soft area within the center of the tooth.

The tooth’s nerve lies within root canals, which lie within the roots (also known as “legs”) of the tooth. The root canals travel from the tip of the tooth’s root into the pulp chamber, which also contains blood vessels and connective tissue that nourish the tooth.

A tooth’s nerve is not vitally important to a tooth’s health and function after the tooth has emerged through the gums. Its only function is sensory — to provide the sensation of hot or cold. The presence or absence of a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of the tooth.

Why does the pulp need to be removed?
When nerve tissue or pulp is damaged, it breaks down into bacteria that begin to multiply within the pulp chamber. The bacteria and other decayed debris can cause an infection or abscess, a pus-filled pocket, which can form at the end of the root. An abscess occurs when infection spreads all the way past the end of the root. In addition to abscess, an infection in the root canal of a tooth can also spur:

-Swelling that may spread to other areas of the face, neck, or head.

-Bone loss around the tip of the root.

-Drainage problems extending outward from the root. (A hole can occur through the side of the tooth with infection spreading into the gums and cheeks.)

How painful is the procedure?
Root canal procedures have the reputation of being painful. Actually, most people report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a filling placed. For more information, schedule a consultation with Polyviou Family Dentistry today.

A bridge (also called a “fixed partial denture”) is a restoration that replaces or spans the space where one or more teeth have been lost. There are two types of bridges – fixed and removable. A fixed bridge is bonded or cemented into place – only a dentist can remove it. As its name describes, a removable bridge (more commonly known as a “removable partial denture”) can readily be taken out of the mouth for cleaning. Although removable bridges are generally less expensive, fixed bridges may feel more stable and comfortable.

Why do I need a bridge?
Your appearance, overall dental health and proper functioning of your mouth are all important reasons for wearing a bridge. When teeth are lost, it can put unnatural stress on your other teeth and cause them to shift, making proper brushing and regular hygiene hard to accomplish, leaving the door open to a myriad of other problems.

A bridge, of course, has great cosmetic appeal as it offers cover for a lost tooth. In some cases, the loss of a back tooth may cause your mouth to sink and your face to look older. Bridges can help maintain the natural shape of your face and may help support your lips and cheeks.

How is a bridge attached?
A fixed bridge is commonly cemented to the natural teeth next to the space left by the missing teeth. A false tooth (called a “pontic”) replaces the lost tooth. A pontic is attached to a crown (a restoration that covers a tooth). Crowns, which are cemented on natural teeth, serve as abutments that provide support for the bridge.

Are there different types of bridges?
Yes. For example, implants attach artificial teeth directly into the jaw or under the gum tissue. Because they require surgery, candidates for implants should have good general health and have adequate bone to support an implant.

In some instances, a resin-bonded bridge, frequently called a “Maryland Bridge,” can be used to replace one or more missing teeth. Because the bridge is attached by a special procedure called “bonding,” it doesn’t require the use of crowns or extensive tooth preparation. Polyviou Family Dentistry can help you determine which treatment method is appropriate for you.

Remember, the ultimate success or failure of a fixed bridge depends on its foundation. Help keep your gums and remaining teeth healthy! Your oral health and appearance are worth the effort!

To prevent future problems and promote optimum oral health, follow these simple tips:


  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Brush after each meal (especially before going to bed).
  • Clean between your teeth daily with dental floss.
  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacks. Avoid carbohydrates such as candy, pretzels and chips, which can remain on the tooth surface.
  • If you consume sticky foods, brush your teeth shortly afterwards.
  • Ask the dentist about the use of supplemental fluoride, which can strengthen your teeth.
  • Dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) can be applied, so the chewing surfaces of your back teeth (otherwise known as your molars) can be protected from decay.

Malocclusion and Periodontal Diseases
Malocclusion affects 74% of American adults. If you have malocclusion, it may affect your periodontal health, because it is difficult to remove plaque when teeth are not aligned. Periodontal disease can begin as gum redness or bleeding while brushing your teeth or using dental floss, and you may notice halitosis, or bad breath. If not treated, gum inflammation can become worse, leading to soft tissue damage, receding gums, the formation of pockets between teeth and gums, bone loss, and eventually tooth loss.

The Progression of Periodontal Disease
When teeth are crowded, plaque with harmful bacteria can attach to the tooth surface down to the bottom of the pocket. Plaque can be tedious to remove from crowded areas because it is difficult to brush and floss there. Bacteria can cause gum tissue surrounding the tooth to degrade, and if not treated, result in bone loss.

Wear and Trauma
Poorly aligned teeth can also create unnatural stress and pressure on teeth and jaws. Teeth that are subject to excessive pressure can develop chipping and notches at the gum line called abfractions. Premature wear can lead to poor root support, loose teeth and eventually, tooth loss.

Why are Crooked Teeth a Problem?
Teeth that are not aligned properly in your mouth create what dentists call malocclusion. Left untreated, malocclusion can lead to periodontal disease and create abnormal amounts of stress on teeth and jaws, which leads to premature wear.

What Type Of Malocclusion Do You Have?
Here are some potential issues.

CROWDING
Buildup of plaque and tartar
Harbors harmful periodontal bacteria
Risk of periodontal disease, tooth, and bone loss

SPACING
Food lodges between teeth
Risk of sore, tender gums
Risk of periodontal disease

DEEP BITE
Over-erupted lower front teeth that can damage the palate
Premature wear and chipping of the lower front teeth

CROSSBITE
Premature tooth wear and risk of chipped teeth
Abfraction — small notch in tooth at the gumline
Periodontal disease, tooth and bone loss

EXCESSIVE OVERJET
Chipped or fractured front teeth
Trauma to front teeth

EDGE -TO-EDGE BITE
Risk of teeth chipping and breaking
Jaw joint pain
Shortened or worn down front teeth

OPEN BITE
Abfraction — small notch in tooth at gumline
Gum recession, loose teeth and bone loss
Excessive, premature wear on back teeth
If left untreated, malocclusion can lead to periodontal disease and premature wear of teeth that can worsen over time and even result in tooth loss. Periodontal disease may also increase the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (hardening of the arteries).



(Crossbite)


(Crowding)


(Openbite)


(Deepbite)

 

Straight Teeth are Healthier Teeth
Straight, properly aligned teeth can help you avoid the negative effects of periodontal disease.

HEALTHIER GUMS
Properly aligned teeth are easier to brush and floss than crowded or crooked teeth.  Properly positioned teeth can help gums “fit” more tightly around them, which may lead to better periodontal health.

IMPROVED HYGIENE
With good oral hygiene, the chances of having plaque retention, tooth decay, and periodontal disease can be reduced.

DECREASED RISK OF ABNORMAL WEAR AND TRAUMA
Properly aligned teeth also reduce the risk of expensive procedures required to repair the effects of abnormal force, such as tooth chipping, breaking or wear, and can be less stressful on the supporting jaw bone and joints.

MALOCCLUSION: A RISK TO OVERALL HEALTH
Severe periodontal infection, if untreated, may increase the risk for atherosclerosis-induced conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke, complications of diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and respiratory diseases.

 

Systemic Problems

  1. Bacteria forms a film underneath the gums, particularly where teeth are misaligned.  Gum pockets form, further trapping bacteria and debris.
  2. Bacteria inflames the gum tissues and kills gum tissue cells and can invade connective tissue and blood vessels.
  3. Your immune system creates white blood cells and proteins to fight the inflammation.
  4. The combination of bacteria, toxins, white blood cells, and acute phase proteins damages the cells that line your coronary arteries, resulting in plaque and leading to hardening of  the arteries.

OFFICE INFO

3784 Dix Toledo Rd. Lincoln Park, MI 48146

MON: 8am - 5pm
TUE: 7am - 4pm
WED: 9am - 6pm
THU: 8am - 5pm
FRI: 9am - 1pm

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Copyright © Polyviou Family Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

OFFICE INFO

3784 Dix Toledo Rd. Lincoln Park, MI 48146

MON: 8am - 5pm
TUE: 7am - 4pm
WED: 9am - 6pm
THU: 8am - 5pm
FRI: 9am - 1pm

GIVE US A CALL

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

855-432-SMILE (7645)

SOCIAL

Copyright © Polyviou Family Dentistry.
All Rights Reserved.